Between the heat of the sauté grill and clang of pots and pans, the student-chefs at Keystone College seem truly professional.

At the Hibbard Campus Center, in the Fireplace Lounge, students run a restaurant called the Chef’s Table, where they create menus, run the kitchen and dining room, and take great strides toward a fuller understanding of the dynamics of a restaurant.

The program has been in the works for roughly 20 years, according to certified Executive Chef Mark Seibert, a faculty member in Keystone’s culinary program who supervises students at The Chef’s Table.

“There aren’t too many other culinary programs where you’re actually working in a kitchen,” Seibert said. “They’re earning credits for college.”

Still, looking at a menu filled with specialty gourmet cuisine like pan-seared rack of lamb and fire-grilled filet mignon, it’s hard to believe that such a fine dining experience is the product of a classroom.

Students at the restaurant typically work two nights a week, totaling around 20 hours in the restaurant.

There, they switch positions between the many facets of the kitchen and the dining room.

In charge of reservations, seating, and the ‘front-end’ of the restaurant is adjunct instructor for the business management department of Keystone, Susan Cappelloni.

She directs servers and bus-boys, who sometimes come from outside departments to earn credits. Cappelloni is also responsible for keeping the kitchen up-to-date on reservations, cancellations and any other guest-related information that’s pertinent.

The kitchen is broken down into six basic stations: the cold station, for salads and desserts; the grill; the sauté station; the ‘float’ station, which helps with the preparation of side dishes; the ‘expediter,’ who calls out orders; and the dreaded dish washing station.

Each week, the students are assigned to a different station, effectively preparing them for whatever position may await them after the completion of Keystone’s culinary arts associate’s degree.

According to Seibert, many positions await his students.

“Most of our students are placed in the culinary industry. We have good placement - in the nineties, I think,” Seibert said. “Our students are sought after.”

For The Chef’s Table, only students in their second year of the program are able to participate.

The first semester, Seibert is hands-on, showing students exactly what to do in every situation. In the second semester, he eases off and lets them make their own decisions.

“You’ll still hear me barking, but they know what they have to do,” Seibert said.

Right before each semester begins, reservations open for dinners throughout the semester, usually four per week.

On a busy night, 40 people will be seated from 5:30 to 7 p.m., each paying $20-30 for a four-course meal.

Although there is hardly any profit margin, money made is used to sustain the program.

“It’s the real deal. We’re asking for money like every restaurant, so it’s no joke,” Seibert said. “We’re not charging as much as we should, but we’re filling the seats.”

Having people to serve is more important than making money because, as Seibert put it, The Chef’s Table is a classroom first and foremost.

Other menu items include:

* Appetizers: brown sugar-cured pork belly, three-cheese crepes, citrus-poached shrimp and smoke salmon and Asian beef and rice balls

* Soups/salads: ham and lentil soup, carrot curry bisque, haricots verts and roasted beet salad

* Entrees: salmon with dill sauce, rack of lamb, filet mignon, scaloppini of veal, and papardelle with zucchini

* Desserts: different specials

Reservations can be made by calling Cappelloni at 570-945-8441 or by emailing chefstable@keystone.edu.

Between the heat of the sauté grill and clang of pots and pans, the student-chefs at Keystone College seem truly professional.

At the Hibbard Campus Center, in the Fireplace Lounge, students run a restaurant called the Chef’s Table, where they create menus, run the kitchen and dining room, and take great strides toward a fuller understanding of the dynamics of a restaurant.

The program has been in the works for roughly 20 years, according to certified Executive Chef Mark Seibert, a faculty member in Keystone’s culinary program who supervises students at The Chef’s Table.

“There aren’t too many other culinary programs where you’re actually working in a kitchen,” Seibert said. “They’re earning credits for college.”

Still, looking at a menu filled with specialty gourmet cuisine like pan-seared rack of lamb and fire-grilled filet mignon, it’s hard to believe that such a fine dining experience is the product of a classroom.

Students at the restaurant typically work two nights a week, totaling around 20 hours in the restaurant.

There, they switch positions between the many facets of the kitchen and the dining room.

In charge of reservations, seating, and the ‘front-end’ of the restaurant is adjunct instructor for the business management department of Keystone, Susan Cappelloni.

She directs servers and bus-boys, who sometimes come from outside departments to earn credits. Cappelloni is also responsible for keeping the kitchen up-to-date on reservations, cancellations and any other guest-related information that’s pertinent.

The kitchen is broken down into six basic stations: the cold station, for salads and desserts; the grill; the sauté station; the ‘float’ station, which helps with the preparation of side dishes; the ‘expediter,’ who calls out orders; and the dreaded dish washing station.

Each week, the students are assigned to a different station, effectively preparing them for whatever position may await them after the completion of Keystone’s culinary arts associate’s degree.

According to Seibert, many positions await his students.

“Most of our students are placed in the culinary industry. We have good placement - in the nineties, I think,” Seibert said. “Our students are sought after.”

For The Chef’s Table, only students in their second year of the program are able to participate.

The first semester, Seibert is hands-on, showing students exactly what to do in every situation. In the second semester, he eases off and lets them make their own decisions.

“You’ll still hear me barking, but they know what they have to do,” Seibert said.

Right before each semester begins, reservations open for dinners throughout the semester, usually four per week.

On a busy night, 40 people will be seated from 5:30 to 7 p.m., each paying $20-30 for a four-course meal.

Although there is hardly any profit margin, money made is used to sustain the program.

“It’s the real deal. We’re asking for money like every restaurant, so it’s no joke,” Seibert said. “We’re not charging as much as we should, but we’re filling the seats.”

Having people to serve is more important than making money because, as Seibert put it, The Chef’s Table is a classroom first and foremost.

Other menu items include:

* Appetizers: brown sugar-cured pork belly, three-cheese crepes, citrus-poached shrimp and smoke salmon and Asian beef and rice balls

* Soups/salads: ham and lentil soup, carrot curry bisque, haricots verts and roasted beet salad

* Entrees: salmon with dill sauce, rack of lamb, filet mignon, scaloppini of veal, and papardelle with zucchini

* Desserts: different specials

Reservations can be made by calling Cappelloni at 570-945-8441 or by emailing chefstable@keystone.edu.